Brain, Vision, Memory: Tales in the History of Neuroscience by Charles G. Gross

By Charles G. Gross

Charles G. Gross is an experimental neuroscientist who focuses on mind mechanisms in imaginative and prescient. he's additionally eager about the heritage of his box. In those stories describing the expansion of information in regards to the mind from the early Egyptians and Greeks to the current time, he makes an attempt to respond to the query of ways the self-discipline of neuroscience advanced into its smooth incarnation throughout the twists and turns of history.

The first essay tells the tale of the visible cortex, from the 1st written point out of the mind via the Egyptians, to the philosophical and physiological reports through the Greeks, to the darkish a while and the Renaissance, and at last, to the trendy paintings of Hubel and Wiesel. the second one essay specializes in Leonardo da Vinci's appealing anatomical paintings at the mind and the attention: used to be Leonardo drawing the physique saw, the physique remembered, the physique examine, or his personal dissections? The 3rd essay derives from the query of even if there could be a completely theoretical biology or biologist; it highlights the paintings of Emanuel Swedenborg, the eighteenth-century Swedish mystic who used to be 200 years sooner than his time. The fourth essay involves a secret: how did the principally missed mind constitution referred to as the "hippocampus minor" emerge as, and why used to be it so vital within the controversies that swirled approximately Darwin's theories? the ultimate essay describes the invention of the visible features of the temporal and parietal lobes. the writer strains either advancements to nineteenth-century observations of the impression of temporal and parietal lesions in monkeys -- observations that have been forgotten and therefore rediscovered.

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After yet again rejecting Erasistratus’s association of the convolutions with intelligence, Bartholin indicated that their true purpose was75: . . to make the cerebral vessels safe by guiding them through these tortuosities and so protect them against danger of rupture from violent movements, especially during full moon when the brain swells in the skull. Thomas Willis Turns Toward Cortex Before Gall and the development of his phrenological system at the beginning of the nineteenth century, only a very few isolated ªgures advocated signiªcant functions for the cerebral cortex.

1 Aristotle’s Arguments for the Heart and Against the Brain as the Center for Sensation and Movement Heart Brain 1. Affected by emotion (PA669a) 1. Not affected (PA652b,656a) 2. All animals have a heart or similar organ (GA771a, PA665b) 2. Only vertebrates and cephalopods have one, and yet other animals have sensations (PA652b) 3. Source of blood which is necessary for sensation (PA667b) 3. Bloodless and therefore without sensation (HA494a, 514a, PA765a) 4. Warm, characteristic of higher life (SS439a) 4.

Representative of this notion was Thomas Bartholin (1660–1680), professor of anatomy in Copenhagen and discoverer of the lymphatic system. After yet again rejecting Erasistratus’s association of the convolutions with intelligence, Bartholin indicated that their true purpose was75: . . to make the cerebral vessels safe by guiding them through these tortuosities and so protect them against danger of rupture from violent movements, especially during full moon when the brain swells in the skull. Thomas Willis Turns Toward Cortex Before Gall and the development of his phrenological system at the beginning of the nineteenth century, only a very few isolated ªgures advocated signiªcant functions for the cerebral cortex.

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