Art and Meaning: Rhetoric in Biblical Literature (JSOT by David J. A. Clines, David M. Gunn, Alan J. Hauser

By David J. A. Clines, David M. Gunn, Alan J. Hauser

Biblical authors have been artists of language who created their which means via their verbal artistry, their rhetoric. those twelve essays see that means as finally inseparable from paintings and search to appreciate the biblical literature with sensitivity to the writer's craft. Contents: David Clines, The Arguments of Job's acquaintances. George Coats, A Moses Legend in Numbers 12. Charles Davis, The Literary constitution of Luke 1-2. Cheryl Exum, A Literary method of Isaiah 28. David Gunn, Plot, personality and Theology in Exodus 1-14. Alan Hauser, Intimacy and Alienation in Genesis 2-3. Charles Isbell, tale traces and key terms in Exodus 1-2. Martin Kessler, method for Rhetorical feedback. John Kselman, A Rhetorical examine of Psalm 22. Kenneth Kuntz, Rhetorical feedback and Isaiah 51.1-16. Ann Vater, shape and Rhetorical feedback in Exodus 7-11. Edwin Webster, trend within the Fourth Gospel.

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The fact that a suitable companion is not found immediately, but only after prolonged effort by God, helps to emphasize the closeness to man of the ultimate companion, woman. Verse 19. Like man, the animals are formed (ytsr) from the ground Cdmh). The writer thus represents God as attempting to create a companion for man who is as much like him as possible, being formed in the same way and being taken from the same source. 20, where none of the animals proves acceptable as man's companion. In light of this failure, woman, who is the appropriate companion, must be seen to be very close to man.

B. 1:13-22 In terms of the introduction of concepts to be expanded later in the narrative, "fear" (yr1) must also be judged a key word. The phrase "But the midwives feared (wattire'na) God" (v. 17) stands in stark contrast to "And Moses was afraid (wayyira 0 )" in 2:14. The latter sentence pointedly omits a direct object but as the next verse shows, it was the Pharaoh whom Moses feared, not God. And even as fear of God becomes the turning point in 1:15-22, the fear of Pharaoh becomes the turning point in 2:11 -22.

A. 1;8-1» A major concept of the entire exodus narrative is introduced in this paragraph by means of the root cbd. The helpless people called "the sons of Israel" are enslaved by the Egyptians who are led by a cruel Pharaoh. Their slavery, which is introduced here, comes in later units to stand as a symbol of their inability to do anything in their own power to change their situation. They could not liberate themselves; and this is a M Isbell: Exodus 1-2 in the Context of Exodus 1-14 theme which is repeated often in subsequent units; indeed, it is a large part of what the following units set out to demonstrate.

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